Book Review: Ogre Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

Ogre Enchanted

Author: Gail Carson Levine
Series: Ella Enchanted, Book 0.5
Publisher: Harper Collins (October 16, 2018)
Hardcover, 352 pages
Goodreads     Amazon

Summary
In this prequel to Ella Enchanted, which can stand on its own, young healer Evie is transformed into an ogre by the meddling fairy Lucinda. She’ll turn back only if someone proposes and she accepts!

Returning to the land and many of the characters from her beloved Newbery Honor–winning Ella Enchanted, Gail Carson Levine has written a delightful tale about a clever and endearing heroine who is determined to defy expectations.

Evie is happiest when she is healing people, diagnosing symptoms, and prescribing medications, with the help of her devoted friend (and test subject) Wormy. So when Wormy unexpectedly proposes to her, she kindly turns him down; she has far too much to do to be marrying anyone. And besides, she simply isn’t in love with him.

But a certain meddling fairy named Lucinda has been listening in, and she doesn’t approve of Evie’s rejection. Suddenly, Evie finds herself transformed from a girl into a hideous, hungry ogre. Evie now has only sixty-two days to accept another proposal—or else be stuck as an ogre forever.



Rating: 5 stars

Review
First of all, HOW IS THERE NOT MORE HYPE OUT THERE ABOUT THIS?! Gail Carson Levine does it again. This is another amazing installment in the world of Ella Enchanted, Fairest, and Ever. Lucinda is at it again with her “gifts,” and they’re just as terrible as ever. This book takes place before the events of Ella Enchanted, and you might even recognize some of the characters (like Ella’s mother and fairy godmother!) 

This is such a fun fantasy with some romantic elements. It’s written for middle-grade readers, but it’s so well written that it was entirely enjoyable for this 30-something adult reader (who, admittedly, refuses to grow up…) Gail Carson Levine proves again and again that you can write books that are accessible to a younger audience while still being enjoyable for an adult audience as well, and that you don’t have to write “down to” children in order to write books for them.

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